Soil Erosion in the Beijing Mountains

Picture of Beijing Mountain Forrests
Picture of Beijing Mountain Forrests

erosionhttp://scenery.cultural-china.com/chinaWH/upload/upfiles/2011-03/02/yunmeng_mountain_national_forest_park_small_yellow_mountain_in_beijing7be557151a06fbab37d2.jpghashttp://http://www.urbanhabitats.org/v01n01/images/beijing_map2.jpgTopography of Beijing Map/v01n01/images/beijing_map2.jpg a large problem in the last 20 years in the Beijing Mountain forests.  The canopy of the forrest in the Jiulong mountains, as well as Chinese model of crop cultivation, has lead to a decreased absorption of water on the mountainside.  because of this decrease, the Chinese government has began some conservation programs in order to maintain their crops from these woody mountainsides.  Soil erosion in these mountain forrests can dramatically affect both local crops for the area as well as the natural habitat for many different species and types of flora and fauna.  The erosion was mostly light on a whole, however over the course of 5o plus years the erosion could have become problematic for local economies and crops.

During the 2004-2007 period, most of the conservation efforts took place, with exelent results.  The efforts were mostly made by the Beijing Municipal Government, with some of these priorities being:  Flood susceptibility analysis (insluding slope topography and retention of topography), forest plantation planning, and re-Planting of Native species (Working Paper for ASEM, 4-4).  Although these efforts have been reletivly successful, the threat to soil loss overall is still of concern.

Without increased work on the erosion of soil through over-cultivation, the beijing mountain forests will have little water to use as well.  The cites surrounding the mountain draw a lot of water out of the soil, and resultantly leaves the forrest floor without much moisture for the continued growth of trees and plants.  The government must be more strict with their overseeing of the conservation efforts, and the cities must reduce the amount of water drawn from the mountains and rainwater in order to save these crucial environments from destruction.

The potential impacts of the loss of these forests would be catastrophic for the local areas and the broader countries produce economies.  Without the proper coniferous forrest cover for smaller local crops, and without the proper soil moisture content, their cops will struggle and possibly fail within the next 50-100 years.  The governments strategies for conservation are relatively comprehensive already, but more strict policy measures concerning water usage in cities could help mitigate this possible disaster further.  Because of how large these threats are, the government must take their mitigation efforts more seriously throughout the next 15 years as the Chinese population continues to grow.  The size and scope of cities is really the largest threat to these beautiful mountains today.

Sources:

Click to access Zhang%20et%20al.pdf

http://www.gtzyyg.com/EN/abstract/abstract98.shtml

ftp://ftp.cordis.europa.eu/pub/asem/docs/asem_wp4.pdf

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Problems with Soil Erosion in the Beijing Mountains

Picture of Beijing Mountain Forrests

Picture of Beijing Mountain Forrests

erosionhttp://scenery.cultural-china.com/chinaWH/upload/upfiles/2011-03/02/yunmeng_mountain_national_forest_park_small_yellow_mountain_in_beijing7be557151a06fbab37d2.jpghashttp://http://www.urbanhabitats.org/v01n01/images/beijing_map2.jpgTopography of Beijing Map/v01n01/images/beijing_map2.jpg a large problem in the last 20 years in the Beijing Mountain forests.  The canopy of the forrest in the Jiulong mountains, as well as Chinese model of crop cultivation, has lead to a decreased absorption of water on the mountainside.  because of this decrease, the Chinese government has began some conservation programs in order to maintain their crops from these woody mountainsides.  Soil erosion in these mountain forrests can dramatically affect both local crops for the area as well as the natural habitat for many different species and types of flora and fauna.  The erosion was mostly light on a whole, however over the course of 5o plus years the erosion could have become problematic for local economies and crops.

During the 2004-2007 period, most of the conservation efforts took place, with exelent results.  The efforts were mostly made by the Beijing Municipal Government, with some of these priorities being:  Flood susceptibility analysis (insluding slope topography and retention of topography), forest plantation planning, and re-Planting of Native species (Working Paper for ASEM, 4-4).  Although these efforts have been reletivly successful, the threat to soil loss overall is still of concern.

Without increased work on the erosion of soil through over-cultivation, the beijing mountain forests will have little water to use as well.  The cites surrounding the mountain draw a lot of water out of the soil, and resultantly leaves the forrest floor without much moisture for the continued growth of trees and plants.  The government must be more strict with their overseeing of the conservation efforts, and the cities must reduce the amount of water drawn from the mountains and rainwater in order to save these crucial environments from destruction.

The potential impacts of the loss of these forests would be catastrophic for the local areas and the broader countries produce economies.  Without the proper coniferous forrest cover for smaller local crops, and without the proper soil moisture content, their cops will struggle and possibly fail within the next 50-100 years.  The governments strategies for conservation are relatively comprehensive already, but more strict policy measures concerning water usage in cities could help mitigate this possible disaster further.  Because of how large these threats are, the government must take their mitigation efforts more seriously throughout the next 15 years as the Chinese population continues to grow.  The size and scope of cities is really the largest threat to these beautiful mountains today.

 

Sources:

Click to access Zhang%20et%20al.pdf

http://www.gtzyyg.com/EN/abstract/abstract98.shtml

ftp://ftp.cordis.europa.eu/pub/asem/docs/asem_wp4.pdf

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Hello world!

Welcome to WordPress.com! This is your very first post. Click the Edit link to modify or delete it, or start a new post. If you like, use this post to tell readers why you started this blog and what you plan to do with it.

Happy blogging!

Posted in Uncategorized | 1 Comment